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Species Profiles Project

 

Tree species of interest in a changing climate and to promote forest resilience

 

Introduction


by Dr Peter Savill

Curator of the RFS Species Profiles Project

Peter 16 05 03 2

Dr Peter Savill
Reader in Forestry (Ret.)
University of Oxford

Much thought is being given by foresters to alternative tree species that might be used in Britain if climate change proceeds as predicted, and in the light of the threats posed by tree pests and diseases which have become so numerous since the turn of the century. Several papers on the subject have already appeared in the Quarterly Journal of Forestry. There is also an on-line network that promotes novel species known to have potential to grow well in the UK (SilviFuture, 2015) including nine high priority species, and 20 medium priority species. Also, in the much-publicised Forestry Commission 2009 publication Combating Climate Change, known as the Read Report a number of emerging species were suggested for ensuring that British forests were adapted  to climate change. They included 15 broadleaves and 10 conifers.

This series of papers in Quarterly Journal of Forestry has been covering some of them. I am fortunate in having been helped in this task by some of the best known and most able silviculturists in the country: Drs Scott Wilson, Bill Mason and Richard Jinks.

 

(Oxford, March 2016)

  

Pinus Pinaster Fig 3 Right Lael Wester Ross Fig 5 Pinus Peuce At Carrour Tom Christian June 2015

Pinus pinaster
(Photo: Luis Fontes)

Cryptomeria japonica 
(Photo: Scott Wilson)

Pinus peuce
(Photo: Tom Christian)

 

Papers in the Series 

Picture1 

Paper 1:

 

MARITIME PINE
(Pinus pinaster)

 

Savill, P. 2015. Pinus pinaster Aiton (maritime pine): silviculture and propertiesQuarterly Journal of Forestry 109(1): 29-32

 Picture2

Paper 2:

 

JAPANESE RED CEDAR
(Cryptomeria japonica)

 

Savill, P. 2015. Cryptomeria japonica (Thunb. ex L.f.) D.Don (Japanese red cedar, or Sugi): silviculture and propertiesQuarterly Journal of Forestry 109(2): 97-102

 Picture3

Paper 3:

 

TRUE CEDARS
(Cedrus spp.)

 

Savill, P., and S. McG. Wilson. 2015. Cedrus, true cedars: silviculture and propertiesQuarterly Journal of Forestry 109(3): 168-173

 Picture4

Paper 4:

 

MACEDONIAN PINE
(Pinus peuce)

 

Savill, P., and B. Mason. 2015. Pinus peuce Griseb., Macedonian or Balkan pineQuarterly Journal of Forestry 109(4):245-252

Picture5

Paper 5:

 

SILVER FIRS
(Abies spp.)

 

Savill, P., S. McG. Wilson, B. Mason and R. Jinks. 2015. Silver firs (Abies spp.) of Europe and the Near East: species, silviculture and utilisation potentialQuarterly Journal of Forestry 110(1): 18-30

Picture6 

 Paper 6:

 

EUCALYPTUS 
(Eucalyptus spp.)

  

Purse, J., and A. Leslie. 2016. Eucalyptus - Part 1. Species with forestry potential in the British Isles. Quarterly Journal of Forestry 110(2): 88-97

 Picture7

 

 

Paper 7:

 

EUCALYPTUS
(Eucalyptus spp.)

  

Purse, J., and A. Leslie. 2016. Eucalyptus - Part 2. Findings from trial plantings, and silvicultural requirements in the British Isles. Quarterly Journal of Forestry 110(3): 161-168

  

Picture8

 Paper 8:

 

REDWOODS and RED CEDAR

  

Wilson, S. McG., B. Mason, R. Jinks, D. Gil-Moreno and P. Savill. 2017. The redwoods and red cedar: coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), giant redwood (Sequoiadendron giganteum) and western red cedar (Thuja plicata) – species, silviculture and utilisation potential. Quarterly Journal of Forestry 110(4): 244-256

Picture9

Paper 9:

 

ALTERNATIVE SPRUCES to SITKA and NORWAY
Part 1 - Serbian spruce (Picea omorika)

  

Savill, P., S. Wilson, B. Mason, R. Jinks, V. Stokes and T. Christian. 2017. Alternative spruces. Part 1 - Serbian spruce (Picea omorika). Quarterly Journal of Forestry 111(1): 32-39

 

Further Information

Savill, P. 2013. The silviculture of trees used in British forestry (2nd Ed.) CABI, Wallingford, Oxon.  288 pp.  

 

Links to Additional Resources
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The Quarterly Journal of Forestry currently has an online archive of approximately 1000 articles on all aspects of forestry, including species selection. Membership of RFS includes full access to our online archive, as well as many other benefits. Further information is located here

Resources
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Tel:01295 678588
Fax:01295 670798